Qt and ZIP files

This is a follow up to the series of articles about serialization in Qt that I wrote a few months ago. Sometimes it's necessary to create complex files which contain lots of various information. Serializing everything into one stream of data is not always a good idea. Also sometimes it may be a good idea to compress serialized data, because it's usually quite verbose. Instead of coming up with a custom file format, the best idea is to use the solution which is implemented in may applications and document formats, including both OpenOffice and MS Office documents; that is to wrap data in a ZIP file.

There are many advantages of using the ZIP format. We can save data in multiple smaller files which are zipped together. We can include additional files and attachments, for example JPG images. Finally, we can compress selected files to make the resulting file more compact.

There are a few libraries for Qt which handle ZIP files, including OSDaB and QuaZIP. There are also the QZipReader and QZipWriter classes which are part of Qt. They are internal classes that you can find in src/gui/text subdirectory in Qt sources. There are plans to include them in official Qt API (see QTBUG-20896), but they will not make it into Qt 5.0 and it's not clear whether they will be included in later versions. However, if the license permits, you can simply copy them into your own application (but see the notes about static linking below).

A problem for Windows developers is that all these libraries and classes depend on zlib.h. This is fine on Linux, however zlib is (unfortunately) not part of Windows API. The good news is that QtCore not only includes zlib statically when built on Windows, but it also marks its functions as DLL exports. Thanks to this, the QZipReader and QZipWriter classes, which are part of QtGui, can still work on Windows. In my applications, including Descend which uses ZIP file format for its projects, I simply include the zlib.h and zconf.h files from Qt in the source package and use them when system zlib library is not available. Then I use the following simple .pri file to include either system zlib headers or the custom ones:

contains( QT_CONFIG, system-zlib ) {
  if( unix|win32-g++* ): LIBS += -lz
  else: LIBS += zdll.lib
} else {
  INCLUDEPATH += $$PWD
}

Thanks to this, #include "zlib.h" works no matter if zlib is a system library or not. When Qt is built without system-zlib (which is usually the case on Windows), it will include all the necessary exports in QtCore, so the application will link and work correctly.

Including internal Qt classes as part of the application is potentially dangerous, because there can be conflicts between the classes provided by Qt and by the application itself, especially when the application is linked with a different version of Qt. This is even more dangerous when the application is statically linked with the Qt libraries, which I usually do in Windows release builds to prevent DLL dependencies problems.

To avoid problems, I always remove the 'Q' prefix from such classes. This way they are seen as separate entities from the ones provided by Qt. However, I encountered a strange problem with Descend. In dynamically linked debug builds it worked fine, but when compiled in static release mode, it crashed when copying text to the clipboard. At first I suspected a strange bug in Qt or the compiler itself, and the problem was hard to debug because it only happened in release builds. However, after some analysis, I discovered that QPlainTextEdit copies text into the clipboard not only as plain text, but also in HTML and ODT formats. Coincidentally, creating an ODT document is exactly what Qt uses the internal QZipWriter class for...

It finally turned out that there was an innocent looking structure in qzip.cpp called FileHeader, which I slightly modified, but I didn't rename it. A plain structure would be fine, but this one had an implicit constructor and destructor, because it contained a QByteArray member. Unfortunately the linker doesn't detects such conflicts (it would not be possible anyway, because of how C++ works), but happily overrides the symbols from Qt library with identically named symbols defined in my application.

This can lead to unexpected problems not only when copying code from Qt, but also in many other situations. After all, many libraries can include a class named FileHeader. That's why static linking must be used carefully. Qt generally uses the Q prefix everywhere, even in private classes and functions, to prevent this type of problems, but this particular one didn't have it. If you ever experience mysterious crashes in release builds, this can be one of the possible reasons.

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